Intel chief says chip flaw damage contained by industry

Explore further Krzanich took the unusual step of addressing the security issue as he delivered a keynote ahead of the opening of the huge Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, an industry event expected to draw some 180,000 people from the sector.As yet, Krzanich said, there is no information to suggest any loss of data from the so-called Meltdown and Spectre flaws and he added, “We are working tirelessly to make sure it stays that way.”The Intel chief executive made his most high-profile public comments since the release of research highlighting vulnerabilities affecting the chips powering most modern PCs and many mobile devices.”The collaboration of so many companies (to mitigate the threat) is truly remarkable,” Krzanich said.”Security is job number one for Intel and our industry. The primary focus of our discussions (on this issue) is to keep our customers data safe.”Researchers at Google showed how a hacker could exploit the flaw to get passwords, encryption codes and more, even though there have been no reports of any attacks using the vulnerability.Some analysts have warned that the threat is unique because it is an issue affecting hardware used in many computing systems.Krzanich said updates will be available for 90 percent of its products in the coming days and the for the rest by the end of January, and urged all computer users to update as quickly as possible. Citation: Intel chief says chip flaw damage contained by industry (2018, January 9) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-01-intel-chief-chip-flaw-industry.html Intel CEO sold shares before chip security flaw disclosed © 2018 AFP Intel chief Brian Krzanich said Monday the impact of a recently discovered vulnerability in computer chips has been limited due to “remarkable” collaboration by the tech industry. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. read more

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Missing Interstellar Iron May Just Be Good at Hiding

first_img 11 Fascinating Facts About Our Milky Way Galaxy 15 Amazing Images of Stars Interstellar space should be filled with iron — one of the most common elements in the universe — but scientists have detected only very low amounts of it to date. Now, a new study suggests iron may not be missing, but just really good at hiding. A group of researchers proposes that interstellar iron combines with a certain type of carbon chain to form molecules called iron pseudocarbynes. But because these iron pseudocarbynes register the same signature as carbon molecules on scientists’ detection devices, the sneaky iron remained hidden, according to a statement from Arizona State University (ASU). “We are proposing a new class of molecules that are likely to be widespread in the interstellar medium,” lead author Pilarisetty Tarakeshwar, research associate professor at ASU’s School of Molecular Sciences said in the statement.Headbutting Tiny Worms Are Really, Really LoudThis rapid strike produces a loud ‘pop’ comparable to those made by snapping shrimps, one of the most intense biological sounds measured at sea.Your Recommended PlaylistVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Why Is It ‘Snowing’ Salt in the Dead Sea?01:53 facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65913-missing-interstellar-iron-found.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0000:3500:35  In the extremely cold temperatures of interstellar space, carbon chains might condense onto iron clusters to form these iron pseudocarbynes, they reported. Over billions of years, the iron pseudocarbynes would combine with other elements and form even more complex molecules. Tarakeshar and his team examined the structure and properties of these molecules in the lab. They used infrared spectroscopy to look at the molecule’s signature spectra, or the pattern of light that gets reflected off from them. “We calculated what the spectra of these molecules would look like, and we found that they have spectroscopic signatures nearly identical to carbon-chain molecules without any iron,” Tarakeshar said. “Previous astrophysical observations could have overlooked these carbon-plus-iron molecules.” What’s more, the iron pseudocarbynes might explain how complex molecules of carbon exist in interstellar space. Carbon chains of more than nine atoms of carbon are unstable, according to the statement. But these iron clusters might be sticking onto them and stabilizing them with their grip. The findings were published on June 26 in the Astrophysical Journal. In Images: Rising ‘Phoenix’ Aurora and Starburst Galaxies Light Up the Skies Originally published on Live Science.by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 min and see why everyone is addicted!Vikings: Free Online GameUndoTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndoGundry MD Total Restore SupplementU.S. Cardiologist: It’s Like a Pressure Wash for Your InsidesGundry MD Total Restore SupplementUndoKelley Blue Book2019 Lexus Vehicles Worth Buying for Their Resale ValueKelley Blue BookUndoArticles VallyDad Cuts Daughter’s Hair Off For Getting Birthday Highlights, Then Mom Does The UnthinkableArticles VallyUndoCNETMeet the US Navy’s new $13 billion aircraftCNETUndolast_img read more

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Philippine hit over secret talks with fishermen

first_img World 03 May 2019 Top Philippine court orders government to protect South China Sea Philippines Nation 08 Jul 2019 13 fishermen and four trawlers held by Marine cops Related News Philippines 11 Jul 2019 Panelo excited to debate Amal Related News Fishing for a living: Fishing boats sitting along the shore at San Agustin village in Iba town. — Bloomberg The Integrated Bar of the Philippines (IBP) filed the petition for a writ of kalikasan, a special court order for environmental protection covering three Philippine reefs in the West Philippine Sea, waters within the country’s EEZ.The petition claims the marine environment in and around these reefs has been destroyed by China’s reclamation and poaching activities.Diokno maintained on Wednesday that the fishermen petitioned for a writ of kalikasan “with full knowledge and consent, because all they want is to fish in our own seas and to earn enough to support their families.”He complained that after a Philippine Navy lawyer talked to the fishermen, they withdrew the petition and denied any hand in it.“As one of the lawyers in this case, I am more concerned about the safety of our fishermen. The Duterte administration showed that nothing could get in its way. I hope they use that power to protect their fellow Filipinos,” he said. —Philippine Daily Inquirer/Asia News Network Tags / Keywords: MANILA: Jose Manuel “Chel” Diokno, a lawyer for a group of fishermen who had asked for an environmental protection order from the Supreme Court, has accused the government of underhanded tactics for talking to his clients behind his back to get them to withdraw the case.“It is not only suspicious that the government secretly talked to our clients, that also violates legal ethics,” said Diokno, a human rights lawyer who ran for senator in May.“It seems Filipinos had another Recto-22,” he added, referring to the 22 fishermen from Occidental Mindoro who nearly drowned after a Chinese vessel sank their boat near Recto (Reed) Bank off Palawan province on June 9. After government officials met with them, the fishermen said they were no longer sure what happened.Filed in the Supreme Court on April 16, the petition sought to compel the government to enforce the July 2016 UN arbitral court ruling against China’s claim to almost the entire South China Sea, including parts of the Philippines’ 370km exclusive economic zone (EEZ), whose resources are exclusively reserved for Filipinos by the Constitution. {{category}} {{time}} {{title}}last_img read more

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